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COLLEGE 



y\EW5 



f^- 



Vol. 1. No. 23. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 1902. 



Price, 5 Cents. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. Our House at Newcastle. 



J bei-t Bushnell Hai-t ot 
j Harvaril University, 
I for tlie Historj- Dypt.' 



Thursday, April 17. Evening meeting, a 
missionary debate. 

Friday, April 18. Alpha Kappa Chi Dance 
at 7.30, in the Barn. 

Saturday, April 19. Patriots' Day. Barn- 
swallows. 

Sunday, April 20. The Rev. William F. Mc- 
Dowell of New York City preached in Hough- 
ton Memorial Chapel. 

Monday, April 21. Agora Dance in the 
Barn from 4 to 6. Concert. 
Tuesday, April 22. f Leetuvesby Prof. Al- 

Wedn.esday, April 23. 
Friday, April 25. 

Friday, April 2.0. Meeting of the Philadel- 
phi;. '^i-afe4n-S©onj. 1.C3, College HalJ. - -, — ■; 

Saturday, April 26. Wellesley-Vassar de- 
bate. 

Sunday, April 27. Robert E. Speer of 
New York City will preach. Musical ves- 
pers. 

Monday, April 28. Prof. Albert Burton of 
the Boston Institute of Technology, will speak 
on the "Sitmatra Eclipse." Basket ball game, _ 
19U5 vs Maiden High School, in the after- 
noon. 

Wednesday, April 30. Mr. Charles L. Bur- 
rell willspeak on "The Clearing House" before 
the course on business methods. 

Saturday, May 8. Afternoon, meeting of 
the collegiate alumnte. Evening, Barnswal- 
lows. 

Sunday, May 4. Rev. Edward S. Drown of 
the Episcopal Theological School at Cambridge 
will preach. 

Monday, May 5. From 4 to 6, dance in the 
Barn by Jttnior members of Phi Sigma. Even- 
ing, concert. 

Sitnday, May 11. Rev. John W. Platner of 
the Andover Theological Seminary will 
preach. 



Mr. Rockefeller's Gift. 



Miss Hazard tells us that a good beginning 
on the fund of $150,000 necessary to make Mr. 
Rockefeller's offer of 8150,000 available, has 
been made through the generosity of friends 
of the College. 

Owing to the recent efforts to secure gifts to 
Harvard University and the Institute of Tech- 
nology, promises of money in Boston have been 
difficult to obtain. 

The Alumnaj have been so generous in rela- 
tion to the Income Fund that Miss Hazard 
feels they should not be called upon in this 
matter. However, any and all donations to 
the fund will be most acceptable. Such gifts 
should be sent to Miss Mary Caswell, Secretary 
to the President, Wellesley College. 



Two years ago, by the will of Mr. George F. 
Towle, a house in Newcastle, N. H., was given 
to the College. The conditions upon which 
this hoitse was left to the College were that it 
shottld be used as a "Rest Hottse for the Offi- 
cers and Students of the College." The house 
is situated most beautiftilly on a hill opposite 
the Navy Y'ard at Portsmouth. The house it- 
self is very attractive, and is well furnished, 
everything except linen and silver being there. 
About fourteen people could be comfortably 
taken care of, and it certaintly would be not 
only a delightful summer home, but a most 
economical one — as only a nominal charge 
would be made for the care of the house. 

The house has now been standing idle for 
two years. It is hoped that eventually a ma- 
tron ^''in lie insta,"'!d and suitable arrange^ 
menis made tor summer occupancy. ' Mean- 
while, if anyone has any suggestions to make 
in regard to ways and means, or if several 
members of the College would like to make ar- 
rangements to spend the coming summer at 
that charming spot. Mr. Hardy will be glad to 
give them all necessary information. 

Plans of the house may be seen at any time 
at the Tea Room. 



Wellesley-Vassar Debate. 



As the time for the debate approaches, ex- 
citement over the probable result becomes 
most intense. Almost every Wellesley student 
looks forward to next Saturday night as the 
event of the college year. Vassar i-ises nobly 
to the occasion by sending on sixty students 
(that number beins augmented by thirty 
alumnie from Boston) with her debaters. The 
Debating Committee has decided upon the fol- 
lowing arrangement (subject to change.) "De- 
bate to be held in College Hall Chapel at 
7.30 on Saturday evening, April 26- It is 
hoped that the following members of the Col- 
lege will be admitted : 

Members of the faculty, Senior Class, .Iitnior 
Class, Sophomore Class. 

Office hoiu's for issuing tickets : 
Seniors— Wednesday, A.M., April 23, 9-11. 
Juniors — Wednesday, P.M., April 23, 2-4. 
Sophomores— Thursday, P.M., April 24, 2-4. 

One ticket will be given to each girl either 
upon personal application or upon a written 
order, presented by a student of same class as 
applicant. Tickets not transferable. A volun- 
tary contribution of fifteen cents will be re- 
ceived at office hours." 

Mr. Bliss Perry and Mr. Provost Harrison 
have consented to act as two of the judges. 



At the Art Gallery there is at present being 
held an exhibition of impressions (Squeezes ) 
or Latin inscriptions on tombs, buildings, 
statutes, etc., from Rome, under the auspices 
of the Latin Department. 



ALUMNy^ NOTES. 



Mrs. Junius W. Hill and Miss Mary Brig- 
ham Hill desire to acknowledge through 
the College Netos their hearty appreciation 
of the many letters and tokens of affection 
and interest, which reached them on Saint 
Valentine's Day, from their classmates of 
'93. Their address for two months will be 
No. 732 Cedar avenue, Redlands, Califor- 
nia. 

Miss Hill had a very severe attack of the 
grippe at Colorado Springs, but is much 
better now. 

Miss Helen Eager, '93, has jttst announced 
her engagement to Mr. Vernon B. Swett of 
Brookline. Mr. Swett was a gradtiate of 
Wesleyan in '96. 

M4ss ESitli May, '97, is going to take a 
party for a ninety days' tour through Italy, 
Switzerland, Germany, Holland, France and 
England. Anyone wishing to join Miss 
May's party can see her or write to her at 
Dana Hall, Wellesley, Mass. 

Miss Mary Barnette Gilson, '99, will sail 
April 26th, from Hoboken on the Potsdam, 
Holland-American Line. After spending a 
week in Paris and a few days in Brussels, 
she will go to Frankfurt-on-Main, where she 
will spend the .summer with her sister, Mrs. 
William M. Cooper. Her address until 
October, will be 69 Park Strasse, Frankfurt- 
on-Main, Germany. Miss Lucy A. Plymp- 
ton, '99, will visit her there in .jfvtly. 

Miss Marjorie Belle Hemingway, 1900, 
will be married to Mr. Friedrich Otto von 
Pfister on Wednesday evening, April the 
thirtieth, at half after seven o'clock, in the 
Second Congregational Church, Holyoke, 
Mass. 

The address of Miss Susan Dean Hunting- 
ton, 1900, who is teaching the New Normal 
School at San Juan, Porto Rico, is Box 195, 
San .Juan, P. R. 

Miss Florence Durstine, '01, is si^ending a 
few months in Pineliurst, North Carolina. 

The following are among those of the 
Alumnae who are coming to Wellesley for 
commencement: — Miss Eleanor Green, Miss 
Jennie Furber, Mrs. Anna Wilkinson Rath- 
burn, '92, Miss E. Christy Brooks, '95, Miss 
Corinne Wagner, Miss Flora Skinner, Miss 
Grace Cook, '99, Miss Mabelle Phillips, '00, 
Miss Sue Hall, Miss .Julia Berryman, Miss 
Margaret Mills, Miss .Jessica Sherman, Miss 
Bertha Di Zerega, Miss Pearl Randall, Miss 
Anne Davis Miss Alice Logan, Miss Annie 
McCord, '01 and Miss Louise Sylvester, for- 
merly '02. 



COLI.EGE NEWS 



College IRews. THE LENOX 



To be entered et Weltesley Post Office as Second Class Matter 



Press of N. A. Lindsey i Co., Boston. 



Published weekly by the Wellesley Tea Room Corporation 



Sdbsoription Price— 60 cents per year, payable 
in advance. 

All correspondence should be addressed to Col- 
lege News, Wellesley, Mass. 



EBitor: fllSaris Esther (Ibasc. 
3Bu8tnc38 flftanatjer: Caroline XCltiabt IRouers. 



We all feel deeply soriy that the Fresh- 
men class and Graduates are not allowed 
to hear The Debate — sorry that this, the 
first inter-collegiate debate between Welles- 
ley and Vassar, should not be heard by 
every member of the college. But of 
course, the capacity of the College Hall 
chapel is limited— and we can find no larger 
hall in Wellesley. 

Not long ago the Juniors wished for a 
"Junior Prom." The reason for not grant- 
ing this request is, apparently, because 
there is no hall large enough for such a 
function. 

The Freshman class is the only class in 
college which can take regular gymnasium 
work, because the gymnasium is barely 
large enough to accomodate even the Fresh- 
men class. Many upper class girls are de- 
prived from work in the gymnasium, which 
would help them wonderfully in their phys- 
ical well-being, simply because of lack of 
room. 

It is not only our desire but also our duty 
to get a new gymnasium — a building large 
enough to hold every member of the College 
and many of their friends. 

If tlie students would have a mass-meet> 
ing, choose a committee, and consult with 
the president and the trustees, there could 
surely be a beginning made — which would 
quickly develop into something tangible — 
and we would get our much-needed gyni- 
nasiirm. It would mean much work — and 
concentrated work — on the part of each one 
of us — but it would be work that would re- 
pay us a thousand-fold. 



Tiffany & Co. 



Diamond and 
Gem Merchants 
Gold and Silver- 
smiths, 
Stationers, 
and Dealers 
in Artistic 
Merchandise 

CORRESPONDENCE 
INVITED . . 



Designs and 
Estimates for 

Class JRinf/s 
Fraternity Pins 
Class Cups 
Heraldic 
Enffvavinys 
Book Plates 
Etc., Etc. 



Boylston and Exeter Streets 
BOSTON 

ROMANY-GYPSY BAND 

From Sherry's, New York, Every Evening 



COLLEGE NOTES. 

On Wednesday evening, April 16, Society 
Tau Zeta Epsilon initiated into membership 
Miss Josephine Preston Peabody and Miss 
Grace Bennett, special. 

On Saturday afternoon, April 19, from four 
until six, the Misses Bojaiton and Webber 
gave a reception at 72 College Hall, to meet the 
Misses Bowne and Williams. 

On Saturday evening, April 19, Miss Ethel 
Louise Sanborn gave a dinner at Tau Zeta Ep- 
silon House in honor of her mother. 

Society Tait Zeta Epsilon has sent out invi- 
tations for a Folk Song recital by Mr. Derg- 
hausen on Thursday afternoon, April 24, from 
four until six. 

The entertainment furnished by the Barn- 
swallows on Saturday evening, April 10, con- 
sisted of pantomimes and the farce "Box and 
Cox." The first number on the program was 
a shadow picture of Paul Eevere's Ride, .pre- 
sented by the following people : 

1. Paul Kevere Jane Breeze 

His Friend Anne Orr 

Poem recited by Blanche Wenner 

British Regulars, American Farmers, etc. 
a. Box AXD Cox. 

Box Estelle Kramer 

Cox E. Whidden 

Mrs. Bouncer Alice Stearns 

.3. A Turkish Paxtomime, Ka-foozle-um. 

Babah of Jerusalem Mary Haines 

Ka-foozle-um Mary McKinney 

Sam, Ka-foozle-um' s lover. .Elizabeth Bass 

Slaves * ^''"y Reed 

^'''^'^^ ( Jitlia Hainer 

\. The committee having the entertainment in 
charge consisted of Mary,'^Brooks, Chairman ; 
Elizabeth Lenox, Mary McKinney, Mary 
Haines, Carrie Soutter, Bonnie Himter, 
Blanche Wenner, Julia Hainer. 



Union Square 
New York 



A lass from the South had a waist, 
Which was shapely, and dressed in 

good taste. 
Her style was perfection 
With no need of correction 

And her mental qualities were 0. 
K. She had good judgment. She 
bought her Silks and Pongees at 

Orientalist and l^ug Merchants, 
43 and 45 Summer Street. 



Se/fon h 



PATENT 

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WALTER BAKER & CO. Limited 

Established 1780 DORCHESTEiR, MASS. 







OOIvLEGE NEWS 



ALUMNy^ NOTES. 



Miss Florence Mav, '90. I'eturned from her trip abroad last 
■week. 

On Saturday afternoon, April 10, Miss Helen Ivelsey and Miss 
Bertha March gave an " at home"' in the Faculty Parlor, College 
Hall, for the members of the class of '95, who are near Wellesley. 
Among those present were Mrs. Alice Campbell Wilson, Miss 
Daisy" Lea' herbee. Mrs. Bessie Mitchell Sheldon, Miss Mabel 
VVellman, Mrs: Alice Denny Culbert, Miss Grace Caldwell. Mrs. 
Helen Bisbee Hideout, Miss Sarah Weld. Miss Mary Esther Chase. 
4ind Mr*. ICatherine Fackenthal Lilliefors with lier two eldest 
■chUdreu. 

Miss Marthft Wilcox, '95, has just announced her engagement to 
Mr. William Smyth of Omaha. The wedding will take place in 
June, after which Mr. and Mrs. Smyth will live in Omaha. 



Miss Alice Greathead, '01, visited college, for the Alpha Kappa 
Chi party, last Friday night. 

Miss Leila Day spent a few hours in V\ ellesley on Saturday, 
April 19. 

Miss Marv Davis, '01, will visit VVelleslev in June. 



Miss Henrietta White, "01, spent Sunday at college. 



Miss Lottie Evelyn Bates, '01. chaperoned thirty students from 
Lasell Seminary toWellesley on Saturday. April 19. 



COLLEGE NOTES. 

The Japanese government has just sent Miss Mitsu Okada to 
Wellesley as a special student in English Literature and English. 
We are always glad to welcome Japanese students in our midst. 

At the regular weekly prayer meeting held on Thursday evening, 
April 17, the following (juestion was debated: Resolved, "That 
educational missions have been carried beyond due limits." The 
debaters were as follows: Affli'mative, Miss Lillian Bruce and 
Miss Helen Coale : negative. Miss Helene Buhlert and Miss Lottie 
Atwood. 

The following committee has been chosen to nominate Christian 
Association officers for next \ ear : Miss Pendleton, Miss Slack, 
Miss Coale, Miss Hutsinpillar, Miss Knapp. 

On Saturday afternoon. Miss Josephine Preston Peabody gave a 
reading of her play " Marlowe," in the ShaKespeare house, under 
the auspices of the English Literature Department. 

The concert given on Monday night. April 21, in College Hall 
Chapel, was bolh vocal and historical in character. Madrigals, 
glees and part songs, some of which have never been given in this 
country before, were sung by Miss Edith E. Torrey, Mrs. Blanche 
Heimburgh Kilduft', Sopranos; Miss Marion Clarke, Aho; Mr. 
Bay Fine!, Mr. T. C. Bartlett, Tenors; Mr. Sullivan Sargent, Bass. 

THEATRE BULLETIN. 

Hollis Annie Russell, " The Girl and the Judge" 

Colonial " Ben Hur" 

Tremont Weber and Fields 

Museum "Are You a Mason?" 

Boston Primrose and Dccksledei's Minstres 

L. P. HOLLANDER & CO. 

202 to 2i6 Boylston St. and Park Sq., Boston. 



I^eady to Wear Gowns and Waists. 

JVew Smuiner Goiuns in Muslins, Dimities, Linens 
and Piques. 

New Tailor Suits of fine imported Cheviots, entirely 

over Silk, I33.50. ,, 

New Walking Suits from $25.00 up. ;?5 
Peasant Skirts, $12.00 up. ^^ 

Silk, Cotton and Linen Shirt Waists. f 
Summer Millinery. '' 

Ten per cent, discount to faculty and students. 



Women's BLUGHER OXFORDS 

FOR SPRING. 

H. B. THAYER & CO 

144 Tremont Street, Boston. 

HOTEL TOURAINE, Boylston and Tremont Sts. 
PARKER HOUSE, School and Tremont Sts. 
YOUNG'S HOTEL, Court Street. 

/ J. R. WHIPPLE CO., BOSTON. 

A. SHUMAN & CO., Boston 

Ladies' Suits made by Men Tailors, Ladies' Coats. Ladies' 
Waists. Ladies' Negligee Gowns and Sacques, Ladies' Un- 
derwear, Ladies' Hosiery, Ladies' Shoes, Ladies' Gloves, 
Ladies' Complete Outfits. ... ... 

Shuman Corner, Washington and Summer Streets. 

0. F. HOVEY & COMPANY, 
llmportcre of 2)r? (Boo^s. 



PARIS 
12 Rue Ambroise Thomas 



BOSTON 
33 Summer St. and 42 Avon Street 



^^EcAM^W^m>yy' 



mUUMVLJ 



Dyers 

Cleansers 
Launderers 

17 Temple Place Boston 



AN ETERNAL ANTITHESIS 

Is a pretty girl and an ugly room. Use Dennison's 
Crepe Paper. Cover the walls, drape the windows, 
mantel, tables and dresser with our dainty flower de- 
signs, and 3-ou and your room will be more in harmony. 
DENNISON MFG CO.. 26 Franklin St., Boston. 

Park Hiciing School, Ipswich street. 

Six Instructors— Best Methods. 

Largest Ring in New England. Stable 250 Horses. 

For Terms apply to 

MONTAGUE TALLACK, Lessee and Manager, 

Telephone, 1541 Back Bay. 



1 IMP FAST TWIN-SCREW 



DOMINION 1^1 IN 1^ PASSENGER SERVICE 

BOSTON TO LIVERPOOL (Via Queenstown), 
Sailing every Saturday from Pier 7, Hoosac Tunnel Docks. Charlestown 
Merion (new), April .30. | Commonwealth, May 21. 

Wew England, May 7. | Merion (new), May 28. 

Saloon Rates $6.5 and $80 upwards according to steamer. 
MEDITERRANEAN SERVICE. Boston direct to Gibraltar, Genoa, 
Naples. Saloon rates, $75 upwards. Second Saloon, $50 and $60. 

For further information apply to or address 
RICHARDS, MILLS & CO , 77-81 state street, Boston. 

if you would know the 

MOST DELICIOUS TABLE WATER, 
order 

LONDQNDER RY. 

It's a FOWNES' 

That's all you 
need to know about 
a glove 



COLLEGE NEWS 



COLLEGE NOTES. 



Professor Cooley is siting this year an intensely interesting course 
on Trees and Forestry. Wellesley is the only woman's college in 
America giving such a course. 



Writing about trees reminds us of an amusing incident whicli 
occurred not many years ago. A very prominent and popular class 
■chose for its class tree the Sycamore Maple. The tree was planted, 
and flourished riglit royally. In tlie spring of its Sophomore year, a 
Botany student, in its midst, took for special study her class tree. 
Slie handed a leaf of lier tree to lier instructor, labeling it Sycamoi'e 
Maple. "Not so," said the instructor, and so it proved. The tree 
■was not a Sycamore Maple. Consternation reigned. Very quietly 
and secretly arrangements were made for a Mock Tree Day, and a 
real Sycamore Maple was planted. The Mock Tree Day was most 
deverly carried out, to tlie amusement of tlie wliole college. 

Members of tlie college interested in chess have been invited to 
join the Woman's Chess Club of New Tork, the meetings of whicli 
are held in Carnegie Building from November until May. the object 
being the advancement and cultivation of cliess playing as recreation. 



Washington Wellesley Club. 

The annual luncheon of the Washington Wellesley Club was held at 
the Shoreham, Saturday, April 12. Twenty-one members of tiie club 
were present, and we were delighted to welcome as guests Mrs. Paul 
and Mrs. Emma Teller Tyler, who was with us for the first time in 
four years. 

Miss Saxton, the president of the club, introduced the si^eaker in a 
happy manner, and the following toasts were given : 

The Denver Club .' Mrs. Tyler 

An A dventure - Miss Harrison 

The Babies, Bless Them Mrs. Gould 

The Wellesley Graduate far Afield Miss Wilkins 

Other People's Children Miss Eaynal 

Our Associate Members, the Men Miss Elliott 

Wellesley People Mrs. Gerry 

At the close, Mrs. Paul spoke on the College Girl of To-day, and 
after a half-hour of informal greetings, the pleasant afternoon was 
over. 

It is said that Richard Harding Davis' hero, "Captain Macklin " 
(now published serially in Srrihners), was suggested to him by a 
man who handed him a business card on which was inscribed 
"Promoter of Revolutions." Mr. Davis considers him one of the 
most interesting characters he ever met. The Captain Macklin of 
the story is a young West Pointer, and in the May number he reaches 
the army of revolutionists who are the begiuuing of his marvellous 
adventures. 

AT THE TEA ROOM. 

Although beef has "gone up," the very best of Beefsteak at the 
very lowest price can be had for your money at 
THE TEA ROOAl. 

Announcements. 

Mrs. Moseley, 344 Boylston street, is offering special prices to Wel- 
leslev students. See card on page 6. 

Shreve, Cku.mp & Low, Boston, Jewelers, authorized makers of 
the Wellesley Seal Pin. 

RoTHE, 493 Washington street, furnishes wigs and make-up for 
Wellesley theatricals. 

Attention of ladies are invited to the announcement made in this 
paper by Messrs. E. R. Knights <fe Co., 174 Tremont street, on the 
subject of silk waists and silk jietticoats. 

Meyer, Jonasson & Co., 
WAISTS. 

A complete assortment of Exclusive Styles in Pongee and 
India Silks — comprising: the <t^^<~w^ ^/\ t\f\ 
newest tucked and plaited effects *P^»V^ to ;P0.yU 
Of Butclier Linen, Pique and Madras — in plain and tucked 
effects, also in various styles ofdj| CA <t'^Ork 

fine tucked lawn with lace •P*-^^ *° CPZ.ytf 
insertion. 

Tremont and Boylston Streets, Boston. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



FOR WOMEN 

Waists, Stocks, Belts, Collars^ 
Gloves, 

Outfitter to Men and Women. 
509 Washington St.. Cor. West, Boston. 



RAY 



loWKEfs 



CHOCOLATES 

SO and 60c per Il>» 



DELICIOUS— DAINTY- PURE. 
4I6 Washington St., ( 4th door North of Summer St. 



Miss H. E. TIBBETTS, 

209 HUNTINGTOJT AyE., 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Sinner, Uea an6 Evening ©owns. 

MILLS & DEERING, 
Butter, Cheese ^^ Eggs, 

Stalls : 22 and 24 Quincy Market, 
BOSTON. 




Bonbons and Chocolates, 
J46 Tretnont St. 

GEO. P. RAyMOND CO. 

Costume ■■■ Parlors, 

17 Boylston Place, Boston. 

Costumes tor private ttieatricals 
and Costume parties. 

B. HURWITCH, 

Ladies' Tailor and 
Fashionable Dressmaker, 

134 Castle Street, Boston 
John A. Morgan S Co. 

PHARMACISTS, 

Shattuck Building, Wellesley, Mass. 

"TOM" GRIFFIN 

Carriage at Station on arrival of 
trains. Order Box at nortli door of 
College Hall, Reliable Horses and 
Carriages to let. Baggage trans- 
ferred. 

Telephone. 

Jewelers anb 

Established 1868. ©ptiCiatlS. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Promptly 
Filled. High Grade Repairing a 
Specialty. We are Agents for Water- 
man's Ideal Fountain Pen. 

J. H. WASHBURN CO. 
41 Main St.. Hatick, Mass. 

T. D. COOK & CO. 

CATERERS, 

Teas 
and Spreads. 



HOLDEN'S STUDIO, 

20 Kg. Ave., Natick, 

HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS. 

Connected by Telephone. 

($assiiJS /T\' |1all, 

Successor to A. B. Clark, 

THE GROCER, 

Washington St., Wellesley. 

riiss Stasia Enright, 

Manicuring, Shampooing, Ar- 
tistic Hair Dressing, Dealer 
in Hair Goods and Toilet 
Articles, Facial Treatments.. 
Marcel Wave a specialty. 
2A Park St.t Room 3, Boston. 

F. A. Coolidge & Co., 

Dealers in 

Choice Meats and Provisions. 

Washington St., Wellesley. 

J. TAILBY & SON. 
FLORISTS, 

Wellesley, Opp. R. R. Station^ 

Orders by mail or otherwise 
promptly attended to. Con- 
nected by Telephone. 

Clelanb Si XttuberwooS, 

NATICK, MASS. 

Special " Big Value " Morris Cbairs,. 
$5.00; Tea TalDles, Fancy Screens,, 
Scrap Baskets, Coucli Covers, Jar- 
dinieres, Jardiniere Stands. 
Our teams deliver free. 

n. Q. SLATTERY, 
Theatrical Wigs & Make-up 

wigs, Switches, Curls, Pompa- 
dour Rolls to order. 

226 Tremont Street, Boston. 

Near Touralne. 




COLLEGE NEWS 



SPORTS AND PASTIMES. 



ROWING. 

The Freshmen are rightly proud of their new boat, which will be 
christened and taken ont at some time in the near future. Miss 
Lucile Eaton Hill, Head Coach for the Eowing Club, is spending, on 
an average of twelve periods a week with the crews. When one 
realizes the contrast between the crews of ten years ago and to-day, 
then one gains some idea of what Miss Hill has done, in putting row- 
ing at Wellesley on a basis of excellence, that wins for it the respect 
and admiration of all the rowing authorities of the country. Miss 
Hill enjoys the honor of being the only woman coach in America or 
England, and is also alone in her success with rowing as a sport for 
women. 

GOLF. 

Taking advantage of good spring days golf players have begun to 
appear on the college links. This branclr of the college athletics 
was never in more pi'osperous condition than it is this year. The 
grounds are very good, the greens being much improved this spring. 
Several of tlie links have been lengthened and bunkers placed in 
others. The membership of the club now numbers about sixty. 
New members may join by sending the annual fee of three dollars to 
A. E. Snyder, Head of Golf. 

BASKET BALL 

The college basket ball team, which has been practicing In the 
gymnasium during the winter, has now disbanded, and regular class 
teams are forming. The seniors have a squad of sixteen vhich 
played out-of-doors, for the first time this season, last Thursday 
afternoon. Although the season for this game is in the fall of the 
year, we are glad to see that practice is to be kept up. 

Miss Halsey, 1110.5, has sacrificed rowing, to coach the novices on the 
freshman team, and is one of the captains. Miss E. J. Moore is the 
other captain. This team has a reputation to maintain next fall and 
we hope that it will not have been weakened by its loss to the row- 
ing sport. 

TENNIS. 

Tennis will receive enthusiastic support this spring. The rage for 
Ping-pong and Table-tennis, the past winter, has created a fresh in- 
terest in tennis and the prospect is that tlie coming season will wit- 
ness its re-installment to its proper position of importance among 
out-of-door sports. Miss Landis, president of the Athletic Associa- 
tion is agitating the question of additional courts. The two 
courts back of Music Hall, are now in condition, and are 
kept busy pretty much of the time. Tiiose who use the- courts are 
requested to register in the book on the athletic bulletin, the hours 
they wish to play. If in any case the person who has registered 
should find that she could not use the court at that time, a cancella- 
tion of the registration is requested. Certainly, tennis has not been 
supported as its merit as a game demands that it should be, for the 
last four or five years, and the true lovers of the game welcome the 
return of its popularity, witli much delight. 

For College Girls— Shampooing and Manicnring, 

AT REDUCED PRICES. 



Mrs. R. L. MOSELEY, 



344 Boylstnn St. 

Xear Arlington st. 



iVlRS. E. J. CMRLIUS, 

Shirt Waists. $1.50 up; Shirt Waist Suits, $7.00 up; 
Stocks, $ .50 up; Gowns, $tO up. 

34-4 Boylstoii Street, Room 2S. 

B0STON~AND /^AINE RAILROAD. 

Lowest Rates. Fast Train Service between Boston and Chica- 
go, St. Louis, St Paul, Minneapolis and all points West, North- 
west and Southwest. 

Pullrann Parlor or Sleepina: Cars on all through tr.ains. For tickets and 
information apply at anv principal ticket office o( the company. 

D. ,1'. FLANDERS, Gen'l Pass, and Tkt. Agt., Boston. 



MYRA WHITE HA-YINES, 

MILLI N E RY, 

Rooms 40 and 41. 7 TEMPLE PLACE. 

Ten per cent, disconnt to students. May be seen personally Tuesdays and 
Thursdays. 

LUIVCHEOIN. 

Nelson L. Martin OAK GROVE CREAMERY CO. 

445 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

Everything we serve in our Hinlug Hoom is the clioicest and best 
that can be bought, regardless of price. 

The Berkeley Hotel, 

Berkeley and Boylston Streets. 
Modern in Evei-y Detail. 

Restaurant for Ladies. Entrance on Boylston Street 
JOHN A. SHERLOCK. 

CA.ISDIES 

A bargain for every day in the week. Cream 

Mints" is one of them. Two days in each 

. week we will sell the finest kind of Cream 

Mints for 19c. Sold all over Boston for 40c. 

Zbe 5). S. /iftcSonalD Co., 

16 Winter St., and 131 and 132 Tremont St. 

LONDON HARNESS STORE CO., 200 Devonsliire Street, 



"Boston's Leading Saddlers."^ 




Sole Ajjents for 



Mayhew's Safety Improved 
Grip Side Saddle. 



The safest, most perfect and most practical Ladies' Saddle made. 
Now being used in and about Boston to the exclusion of all others. 
Importers and makers of Traveling Bags, Card Cases, Pocket Books 
and novelties in Pig Skin and other fancy leathers. 



M adame May <j& Co. 

ELECTRO TONIC FACE TREATMENTS, 
MANICURE, PEDICURE, HAIR DRESS- 
ING, TOILET ARTICLES. 

15 Temple Place, Boston 



OI^EST Passenger Train service over 
^ the only "Double Track" Route, 
between Boston, Albany and the west. 




A. S. HANSON, Gen'l. Pass. Agent. 



B. T. SUATTBRV COMRAINV, 



FORMERLY AT 84 BEACON ST. 



TAILORED GOWNS 

In fine broadcloth. Veiling 
weave effects, also Silk Coats. 



Etamine, Cheviots and Canvas 



ENGLISH WALKING SUITS. 

Made of West of England pii.xtures in Norfolk, Eton and Cam- 
bridge blouse effects. Also taffeta Walking Suits. 



SILK AND COTTON WAISTS 

Of correct materials, including many of our imported styles. 
LATEST MODELS IN GOWNS 

Of Veiling, Crepe de Chcne, Lace or Muslin. 
MILLINERY 

From the leading Paris and London houses. 

Choice French Neckwear and Neck Ruches. 

Also large variety of Wash Stocks. 



154 AND 155 TREMONT STREET. 

Usual 10 pet cent, discount to Wellesley College Students *od Faculty.